Microsoft makes Bing AI accessible to all users

Microsoft has chosen to make the service available to all users, only months after it astonished everyone—including Google—with the new AI-powered Bing Chat. You may ask questions to Microsoft’s sophisticated chatbot, which uses OpenAI’s GPT-4 language model, using just a Microsoft account. Bing Chat is receiving new features, and Microsoft is promised lots more.

A well-planned demo of Microsoft’s chatbot many months ago had everyone enthusiastic about the era of AI-assisted search. Google was so taken aback by the action that it hastened to release a Bard AI demo a few weeks later. But in Google’s more subdued example, the bot made a clear error that was simple to identify. Even while more investigation reveals that Bing committed its share of errors, Microsoft has been far quicker to implement adjustments.

The new Bing was previously exclusively accessible by invitation, but Microsoft has been steadily expanding access. With the update made today, anyone who wants to communicate with Bing may do so via the Edge browser, which Microsoft would dearly want for you to use. You might be shocked by how many features the new Bing now includes if you haven’t used it since its introduction. As of right now, Bing Chat offers plug-in compatibility, an archive of all your discussions, and picture and video results. The final one may be significant.

Microsoft claims that it is presently collaborating with a number of partners to improve Bing. For instance, a soon-to-be-released connection with OpenTable will let the chatbot make bookings, and a plug-in for Wolfram Alpha will let Bing produce visualisations based on your inquiries. In a few weeks, Microsoft’s Build conference will take place, and we’ll probably learn more about Bing integrations then.

With Bing, Bard, and all the other chatbots that will undoubtedly follow, the internet is about to enter uncharted waters. For the first time, language models are able to ingest substantial portions of the internet and automatically regorge the data. On the information economy, this may have significant consequences.

But these devices continue to have significant issues. A generative AI, like the GPT-infused Bing, can only know what it has already heard, therefore it cannot always know what is true. Even the fabrication of sources will be used by these robots to defend lies. Nobody is yet aware of how to halt these hallucinations. Even the “godfather” of AI, who just left his position at Google, has voiced worries about the risks associated with AI. A brand new world has emerged.

Computer hardware enthusiast trying to convey his thoughts using PTR as a platform.

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